6'0 Tall wife to Muscle Man, mother of 3, full time career woman, with an addiction to running wherever her size 10's will take her.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

The Top of the Mountain

“I've learned that everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."
  • During the climb I learned so much about myself, my limits, my strengths. In the hard work I gained the power, self confidence and knowledge necessary for the struggle ahead. The pebbles in my path kept me sharp, focused on each little step. The day came and I climbed, I reached the peak. THE MOUNTAIN.... a Goal I have worked for over 2 years. The view from the summit is a site to behold, cloud 9, bliss, you can breathe deeply, all weight is lifted from your shoulders. But you cannot stay at the top of the mountain, eventually you have to make the climb back down.
  • Each step on the way down pales in comparison to the ascent. You feel the bruises, the shadows take over, and eventually you hit the BOTTOM. What now? The journey was amazing!! You try to focus on what it felt like to play in the clouds, but reality sets in and you are no longer weightless, you are mortal again.
  • POST race (or big life event) depression is NORMAL!!! Even after a PR performance (or truly positive change). If you feel this, just know that it will pass. The soreness will go away and you will find your fire again. I feel ZAPPED of energy, gumption, inspiration....I know that it is a case of the post race blues. All the anticipation, and excitement and then in an instant (or 3:37:06) it is OVER. I plan to get back to training tomorrow, but I am giving myself today to just be.
  • We still do not have high speed Internet at home... So hang with me. The 1,000+++ emails, TEST LAB TUESDAYS and HIGH FIVE FRIDAYS will return and I am working on the High 5's 5K race report wrap up.... Hang with me

Have you ever experienced the post race blues?? How long did it take you to recover? What finally pulled you out of the slump?

20 comments:

Emz said...

This is such an excellent post. I have run 5 marathons but I still find myself trying to figure out why I am in a "funk" two days after!? So weird. I seriously felt depressed about 4 days after [crying the whole bit]. For me it seems to be about 9-10 days - then, like magic, "I'm good!"

What pulls me out? My daughter. My hubby . . .
. . . And [maybe] the next race I just signed up for. ;)

Denise said...

my post race blues are terrible. they last so long and i feel like i have no purpose, etc. i hate it and usually cure it by signing up for something else...and something more challenging than before!

Marlene said...

I've definitely had that... actually, a few times this week I already cuaght myself feeling BLAHHH and my race is still 5 days away! OOPS!

Great post... thanks for sharing your thoughts. Enjoy today!

Founder of Jog for Joubert Syndrome said...

i always get the post big event blues, and just have to find something else to look forward to whether it is signing up for a new race, planning a vacation or short get away, or busying myself with a new project. i always have to have something to work towards or a goal. which im not sure if thats a good or bad thing about me. hmmmmm???? great post!

Tricia said...

thanks for sharing this, I haven't been there yet but its something for me to store away for the future.

Katie A. said...

Uh, I think you know I had mine after Boston and Big Sur this year! And I can finally say I found my running mojo again this past weekend - just a little over 3 weeks out. It's tough, it's misserable but I know it makes you appreciate the next run that much more!
Glad you're giving yourself another day of break - I think I could have given myself more.
Happy Tuesday!!!

shellyrm aka jogging stroller mama said...

Little is as enjoyable as the actual event. After all the hard work to prepare and then you cross that finish line only to see that what took months to prepare for was over far more quickly than we had hoped.

For me it is important to remember that I primarily run because I enjoy the simply act of being outside running. After a big event there are days that seem to hold little joy but remembering that the road is still waiting for me even after I have completed my lastest success that took me away from my faithful paths. The road is there ready for me to remember that I simply just love to run.

Enjoy the new home! That excitment will surely help you overcome and post race depression. ;-)

Jessica Bridie said...

I haven't really felt the post-race depression, because I have always had another race to look forward to. Usually, before I even finish a race, I am signed up for or am planning to sign up for something else.

I suffered a really bad case of taper madness depression before my marathon though. I ran my first marathon on May 2, and I've been psyched to get back into training because even though I was 10 minutes short of a BQ, I know what mistakes I made and what I'm going to do next time to ensure I get that 3:40. It makes sense for you to be depressed though, since you met your goal, so now it's kind of like "now what?"

Erica said...

your a tough lady Mel!! I love days when I can just be! They are usually so enjoyable!!! Have a great day!

Amy R. Nelson said...

I had the post race blues last year after I did the RNR Seattle half. I didn't even run for a month. Then I ran a 5k with a girlfriend of mine who had only started running a few weeks earlier and she kicked my trash. My competitive spirit kicked back in and I returned to running with renewed zeal.

Shells said...

Totally not related to your post (although post-race blues are totally normal, let yourself recover physically and mentally. Know that those recoveries don't necessarily happen at the same rate but deserve equal care and patience)...

I have 33 emails waiting in my email inbox and just set up a coffee date for 3:30, and totally thought of you and your obsession with 3's.

Congrats on the BQ!!!!!!!!! I hope to join those ranks this fall when I can finally train for another marathon!

Avery & Hailey said...

Love that quote! Thank you!

Irene said...

Yep. It's all about the journey!

Barefoot AngieB said...

I agree completely. Have a wonderful day! That post race blues period is tough and its hard to remember or believe it will happen when you are still prepping for the race.
Still so proud of you!

MCM Mama said...

So very true! I was in a huge funk after my first marathon. It was such a let down to be done. I finally just had to get back out there running and come up with new goals.

This time, I already have some new goals in mind, so hopefully the funk will be less intense or at least shorter in duration.

BTW, shoot me your new address when you have a moment...

Amanda - RunToTheFinish said...

I don't usually get the post race blues, but I'm not a hard core racer. I do however get them after big life events...suddenly all that focused time is freed up and I feel lost...so maybe that's why I'm always striving for some new goal

wendy_kresha@charter.net said...

My running group talked about this before we ran our half-marathon. I think for me, setting new goals right away and blogging have helped keep away the post-race blues. Also, checking up on my running buddies every day for a couple of days after the race made sure that we kept in touch, which also helped. Strangely, though, I think think this almost compares to post-partum depression and is absolutely felt by many people! Thanks for writing about it!

Jameson said...

Post race blues...nothing fried food and a lager can't fix. Sometimes those huge life moments are so powerful its tough to stay up after.

runsher said...

In order to avoid the blues, I think about what's next.Instead of thinking about what was, I think about what I want to do now.The week after the marathon, I ran a Mother's Day 10k, and I made sure that I wore my marathon technical tee as a reminder of what I had accomplished.

Sarah said...

I just found your blog and wanted to say hi :-)

I was a little sad after the half marathon I just ran. The weather was unseasonably warm and I really had to slow down to say in it. The feeling of sadness passed when I started thinking about running for pleasure, instead of for training. It was really enjoyable to run for no reason!