6'0 Tall wife to Muscle Man, mother of 3, full time career woman, with an addiction to running wherever her size 10's will take her.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Time VS Miles

The training plan I am LOOSELY following for my Halloween Half Marathon calls for a LONG run of 1:45. An Hour and 45 minutes of running....OK I can do that. But...shouldn't I try to hit a mileage mark? Not a time mark? Color Tall Mom Confused.

As a ROOKIE I have a lot to learn. I Run FAST when I should go slow. I run on FLAT when I should be doing Hills. I make Rookie mistakes every day and I am LEARNING.. Today I don't have time to Google and read the info..


Could someone please tell me the benefit of running for a time goal rather than a distance goal?

17 comments:

Alisa said...

It seems like all the triathlon plans are minutes not miles. I don't get it either. I really don't like it, I prefer miles!

Mary Sailors said...

I think maybe it's the difference in the fact that if you run a 7 min mile and do a 5 mile run, you will be running less time than me, I can do a 8:30-9 min mile. We would do the same distance, diff times. For a long race, even if it will take you a shorter time, you need to train your body and mind for the possibility of the sheer time it could take. Make sense? Plus depending on climate and landscape, it could take you longer than normal, more time than your regular race pace and running for time will help account for that and even it out. I think. :) Good question!!

onelittletrigirl said...

I read Joe Friel's book (pretty much,in my opinion, best Tri book out there) and he states that for triathletes, it is more about endurance, so the focus is on time, not miles. I have adopted that theory for both swimming and biking...but for running, I still go by miles over time.

Us running rookies! ;)

Suzy said...

I'm curious what others have to say on this. I pick training plans with mile goals because it works better for me. As for 1:45...I'd love that! I run so slow that my long runs all seem to be 1:40 to 2 hrs long.

Jesse said...

When I started training for this marathon, the first plan I went with had most runs based on time (and heart rate). I switched to another plan largely because it is far more motivating for me to count the miles over the minutes. There must be some logic behind running for XX:XX minutes, but I don't fully understand it.

Miles it is, for me.

Lisa Slow-n-Steady said...

I don't like training by time. Because I'm slow. And I don't feel it adaquately prepares me for longer races.

But when I run with a group, we often train by time so that we start and finish together.

Christina said...

Great question. I too run by miles. Its easy to log and easier for me to know where I need to go. You could go run 1hr and 45 miles and see what that equates to with miles and then you'll know where your at miles/minutes.

With a half marathon you really only need your long run to be 10/11 miles so it seems that 1:45 should put your around that. But I'd hate to see you run fast (because I know you can do that),and do something like 15 miles on a longer timed run.

Not sure where you're at in your long run mileage but if I were you I'd run 8 or 9 this weekend, 10 the following, 11, 5, race.

Jennifer said...

I agree with everyone else on this. Stick to miles.
Decaf Jen

Marlene said...

I definitely prefer to aim for a distance and not a time. If I had to run 1:45, I'd worry that I'd just be lazy and slog along at a slow jog since I'm going to be out there for that amount of time anyway - kwim?

Tri Mommy said...

You have to train yourself to be on your feet running for that long. Depending on how fast you are and how long you can maintain that pace will in the end determine how long it takes you to go x miles, but at 1st you need to just make sure you can be out there for a long time without worrying about how far you go in that time. It will all work out!

Lacey Nicole said...

INTERESTING. i really prefer running for distance, but i think running for time helps you practice patience.

busyrunningmama said...

I asked my mentor/coach the same thing......He said it gives your training schedule a bit of a mix, adds some variation. Gives the mental part of the run a new perspective..... In my case, all of my paces are set according to my 5K race PR, so in actuallity a 40 min run for me would be somewhat equivalent to a 4 mile run on my schedule. But given a time, I might go a bit faster and end up with 4.5 miles instead. It is more about endurance, not about a specific mileage. Try it, I find I run a further amount of miles if I run by time and not miles???

J said...

I think running for time gives you a change of pace from the running of mileage. You can use it for comparison later. Like i ran for 30 minutes and got this far and in 3 weeks I ran for 30 minutes and got farther. its all about showing improvement and mixing it up or at least thats what i think.

X-Country2 said...

I love high 5 friday! I'm running Race for the Cure this weekend, and your post below got me thinking about finding a pink shirt to wear. It's supposed to be chilly,a nd all my pink stuff is summer gear.

The CilleyGirl said...

The marathon training plan I'm doing does time for the first six weeks, then goes to distance for the remaining 14 weeks. I've liked doing time to begin with, because I not only know I can do my training in the limited time I have to do it in, but I can see that I am improving. I've got to do an hour and thirty tomorrow and I'm curious to see how my stamina holds up, how far I get, and at what pace. Looking at the mile goal program, I just knew I'd quit that. This has given me a chance to get into the habit.

MCM Mama said...

I'm not a fan of running for a certain amount of time for a long run. I tend to push myself to go faster than my long slow speed when I'm doing that, just to get in a certain amount of miles. If I'm going for miles, I can just ignore the pacing on garmin and run comfortable.

Aka Alice said...

I think many have said it already, but running for time is a way to build endurance (my track club running coach used to call it "time on your feet"). When I was training for a marathon, we started with running for time, then transitioned to running for distance (after all...we eventually had to do a couple of 20+ mile runs)

Now I do both...I go run for an hour and a half, but my goal is to do a certain distance in that time.