6'0 Tall wife to Muscle Man, mother of 3, full time career woman, with an addiction to running wherever her size 10's will take her.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Much to Learn my Friend

I Googled 10K running programs and found a few… The one on Runner's World looked promising (Article HERE). There are various training plans geared toward the level of the runner. Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced seem to be the favored categories.

Soooo which one am I?

Beginner or Novice- Hi my EGO is way to big to even look at that plan. I did the "Rookie" training plan for my marathon and I am ready to step it up.

Intermediate- Runner's World definition for the 10K "You've been running a year or more, done some 5-Ks, maybe even a 10-K. But you've always finished feeling like you could have, or should have, gone faster."

Advanced- This group from the article is "You've been a serious runner for several years, have run many races--perhaps even a marathon. You're familiar with fartlek and intervals, and can run comfortably for an hour-plus. Now you want a breakthrough time--and you're willing to put in a rigorous six weeks to achieve it."

Hmmmm.. Lets review my running career (career LOL):

1. I have been running for over a year seriously. I ran a TON when I was in high school and college to stay in shape for basketball and volleyball.

2. Have competed in a Half Marathon and Marathon within the last 2 months. Have run 5K's and a 12K in the past just to finish.

3. I have no problem running for long distances and rarely get sore muscles. I would consider myself fairly speedy and know I can go faster with practice.

4. I LOVE to get out there and run what feels good, if I want to tackle a hill I will. If I feel like sprinting, I do. But I have never followed a SPECIFIC plan that called those things out.

So I really do not know which plan to pick. I printed the "Intermediate" and looked it over. OK maybe I am a Beginner. I don't even know what a "Fartlek" is…. I found the answer on Wikipedia (HERE). Other terms I am not familiar with "Pyramid Effort" and "Strides."

I am a Mom and lost my BRAIN while pregnant. I have a bad memory, especially when I am running. How the heck am I supposed to follow a program, when I don't even know what all the words mean? I want to do well in my 10K next month and 5K the following month. I want to maximize my time spent on the run. I want to be FAST and feel STRONG. I want a simple plan that I can stick to and that doesn't make me feel like a NOVICE..

Any advice Bloggy friends? Do you have a SIMPLE plan for a 10K (4-6 week plan)? Or do you think I should just make up my own? TEACH ME!!!

Please help if you can :) This green shirt needs to go FAST!!!

10 comments:

Marlene said...

I like the Cool Running programs. Not so much techie terminology!

http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/145.shtml

Morgan said...

I say start with the intermediate and see how it works for you, if it's too much ease up, if it's not enough tweak the advanced to suit your ability. With every training plan there is a lot of tweaking to be made but having a base to go off is the best way to get going in the right direction. You've been running long enough to know what you're capable of. Trust in your ability!

HEATHER said...

Fartlek is my favorite running word. It's not nearly as complicated as it sounds!!

Lisa said...

I agree that you should start with the intermediate and add elements from the advanced. From the plans I have looked at it appears as though the main difference between intermediate and advanced plans are the amount of mileage.

As far as remembering track workouts, there is no way I could remember my workouts. I usually have it written on a little sheet of paper and bring a pen with me so I can record how fast my intervals end up being.

Velma said...

Hal Higdon has good plans - I used them for my first half, and the 10K plans looked good. I bet you did Fartlek workouts in college. Your note cards are super cute!

Irene said...

You are far from a beginner. I agree with everyone to do the intermediate plan and rearrange it as you go.


"I am a Mom and lost my BRAIN while pregnant. I have a bad memory, especially when I am running."

I've been running in events for over 10 years and I still try not to think when I run, which is why I joined a track club -- they do the thinking for me. I just show up and follow what ever everyone else is doing within my time group, which is the slow group.

In addition, my kids are now adults and the brain has yet to return... :)

Shelley said...

I agree... go for the intermediate, and if you feel like stepping it up, play with workouts like fartleks or intervals as described in the advanced. Have fun with it!

Here's another vote for www.halhigdon.com. The website's not 100% user friendly, but there are explanations for the terms you see in the workout plan. I'm using the marathon plans for the Nike Women's Marathon in October.

RunToFinish said...

yeah I think it depends on how intense you want training to be...personally I love running and don't want any kind of plan that is going to make me dread it..so I don't use anything advanced and I've been doing 1/2 marys and such for 8 years

RunToFinish said...

yeah I think it depends on how intense you want training to be...personally I love running and don't want any kind of plan that is going to make me dread it..so I don't use anything advanced and I've been doing 1/2 marys and such for 8 years

RunningLaur said...

I agree with most of the other commenters - I'd go intermediate and adjust as needed.

You should include some speedwork just to get some good sprinting in your legs, and a few tempo runs (maybe 5 miles or so, 7 total) would be great test runs to know what you can to at the distance.